My name is Jacob Paulsen and in the last two weeks, I was able to witness something that changed my life.

My wife and I were both born and raised in Southern Wyoming and as such we have connections to The University of Wyoming. My father received his master’s degree from UW and both my father in law and mother in law have received multiple degrees from UW.

Now living in Colorado, I work as a volunteer to coordinate with local and regional media outlets when news stories involving The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints are covered.

Several weeks ago I received a phone call informing me that there may be some media interest in an upcoming food donation that the church was involved with in partnership with The Black 14 Philanthropy organization.

I had to dust off my Wyoming roots and do a little research to refresh my memory.

Before it was a non-profit organization to support schools, university, black student athletes and underserved communities the Black 14 were just 14 University of Wyoming football players.

In 1969, these 14 football players approached their football coach Lloyd Eaton and asked permission to wear black armbands during the upcoming home game against BYU.

As this time, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, which owns and operates BYU, had a policy that excluded black people from the priesthood of the church and many athletes on other teams had worn black armbands to silently protest against that policy.

The church, through revelation to the prophet, changed it’s policy less than a decade later but in 1969 these 14 players were caught by surprise when they went into Eaton’s office to request permission to wear the armbands.

Coach Eaton immediately dismissed them from the team. The loss of these players was a devastating blow to the team. At the time of the incident the Cowboys were undefeated and ranked 16th in the AP Poll. It was all downhill from there and many feel that 50 years later the team has yet to fully recover.

Black 14 Member & future New England Patriots player Tony McGee drinks water during practice at Bryant College in Smithfield, R.I. on Sept. 3, 1981. (Photo by Frank O’Brien/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

In 1971, when my father and mother in law attended UW they have memories of walking through picket lines to get to the church owned institute where they took religious classes near the campus. The wound was fresh and in many ways for some The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints became to target of the frustration and scorn of UW football.

The Church didn’t kick the players off their team. Coach Eaton did based on the school’s “no protesting” policy.

In the mid 1980s my father attended UW to complete his masters degree. He finished his undergrad at BYU and while living in Southern Wyoming spent several summers in Laramie to finish his masters degree.

He tells me he may be one of very few people in this country who can say (or dares to mention it out loud), that he has a degree from both BYU and UW. Nearly 15 years after the incident the wounds hadn’t healed for many at the University of Wyoming.

Fast forward a few decades. In the fall of 2019, appx 50 years after the incident, The University of Wyoming invited back the Black 14 to speak to students, attend a special dinner, receive an official apology letter, and receive jerseys and letterman jackets.

At a football game attended by the eight players that returned the student body that consists of members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day saints wore Black 14 T-shirts during the game.

In 2020, members of the Black 14 saw the need for food to be donated to help those who are suffering during this pandemic as we enter the holiday season.

Working with Gifford Nielson, President of the Church’s North America Central Area, the Black 14 made an arrangement that many may consider a miracle.

The church agreed to donate and deliver 360,000 pounds of food across the US to cities and local charities selected by surviving members of The Black 14.

John Griffin, a member of the Black 14 who resides in Denver selected Catholic Charities of Denver to be one of those recipients. So on November 17th at 9:00 AM a Deseret Industries semi-truck pulled into the Salvation Army Warehouse in Aurora.

Representatives of The Salvation Army, Catholic Charities, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Denver Rescue Mission, and John Griffin and his family. Nov 17th, 2020 Aurora, CO

Catholic Charities who lacked a large enough storage facility called on The Salvation Army to receive and store the food donation long enough for it to be distributed to various food banks and organizations across the metro including the Denver Rescue Mission, Salvation Army, and various Food banks and ministries.

From here I don’t need to tell the rest of the story. The local media has done so for me. Below I include some of the video news coverage and a link to The Denver Post.

I end my part of this story by telling you that time can not only heal wounds but also turn hearts toward each other. As I look back at my own family’s history as proud members of a Church that provides vast relief to people affected by tragedy; and the many UW degrees proudly displayed in homes on both sides of my family; it all has come full circle for me as the charity of Christ conquers all.

CBS Denver Nov 17th, 2020

9News Denver Nov 26th, 2020

KWGN 2 News Nov 17th, 2020


Colorado Gives

 

For all who have volunteered time, talent or energy to others in need, it’s easy to understand the feeling of wanting to do more. You might wish for deeper pockets or unlimited resources to make your giving more significant. Today is the day where a bit of that wish comes true. December 4 is Colorado Gives Day, which means that as each of us goes online to give, our donations have potential to be magnified by the $1 Million Incentive Fund. You can help through ColoradoGives.org, a year-round, online giving website featuring more than 2,300 nonprofits. Last year brought in $36 million in a 24-hour period.

Wondering where to start? Below are a few JustServe partners who stand in extra need and would benefit from a boost on this day of giving.

 

 

Volunteers of America

The Volunteers of America provides a variety of year-round support to those in need. Areas that need the most right now include serving meals at a daytime shelter and helping with yard clean up for senior citizens. They also have several volunteer from home ideas that include writing letters to veterans, decorating bags for meals on wheels, or even putting together a craft kit for low income preschool students.

Catholic Charities

In like manner, Catholic Charities offer a variety of services and can use volunteers to help pull together. Current opportunities include helping at a women’s shelter, either serving dinner, decorating cookies, or hosting a movie night. You can also host a Christmas party for residents of Catholic Charities housing, or adopt a family for Christmas.

 

Lutheran Family Services

Lutheran Family Services (LFS) is the largest refugee resettlement agency in the Rocky Mountain region. Every year LFS responds to needs of 30,000 people. One simple but constant need is for diaper donations. Clients often have large families and always need diapers. You can also help with creating baby baskets for refugee families who are either expecting or have just had a new baby.

In this season of giving, and as we Light the World, we hope you will consider joining in this day as Colorado Gives.

 


There With Care is a national charitable organization that helps and supports families going through significant medical crises. Recently a representative from the Boulder chapter visited Sisters of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints during a planned service project to share some of the specific needs the organization has.

That evening these wonderful sisters gathered donations and decorated grocery bags used by families being served by There With Care.

Julie Hess of There With Care shared these thoughts after the activity

I wanted to take the time, again, to thank you for giving me the opportunity to share the mission of There With Care at your church this week.  I so enjoyed getting to know this wonderful group of women and I am so impressed with their eagerness to help and to give back to their community. I loved looking through the decorated grocery bags and seeing everyone’s artistic style!  As I mentioned, the families have let us know repeatedly that this extra bit of CARE demonstrated by decorating the bags really helps to boost their spirits. We are also so incredibly grateful for the large amount of grocery and baby items you were able to donate.  WOW!  I think that was one of our largest “wish list” donation yet! Please share with the women a big THANK YOU from There With Care!

Donations gathered for There With Care


Jefferson County is a better place because of The Action Center. Since 1968 The Action Center has provided an immediate response to basic human needs and promoted pathways to self-sufficiency for county residents and the homeless.

On February 10th Mormon women in the Arvada area came together to help The Action Center.

The women had the opportunity to purge the unnecessary out of their lives to benefit those in need.  They brought their used t-shirts to a Women’s Conference meeting where they transformed them into reusable grocery bags for The Action Center.

(more…)


Coal Creek Ward Compassionate Service Leader, Elly Fryer, and her daughter, Addie, (left) pictured with the IRC’s Victoria Francis (right).

About one year ago The International Rescue Committee (IRC) opened an office in Denver. The IRC (rescue.org) is committed to providing opportunities for refugees, asylees, victims of human trafficking, survivors of torture, and other immigrants to thrive in America.

Each year, thousands of people, forced to flee violence and persecution, are welcomed by the people of the United States into the safety and freedom of America. These individuals have survived against incredible odds. The IRC works with government bodies, civil society actors, and local volunteers to help them translate their past experiences into assets that are valuable to their new communities. (more…)


Denver Stake Youth and leaders recently helped prepare nearly 1,700 lbs.of food to donate to Metro Caring. The representatives from Metro Caring were beyond thrilled. One of the food coordinators said, “Wow! This is better than I could have imagined!” when LDS volunteers pulled up with two vans full of food.